Realistic planetary colonization...at the beginning of the space age

One of the things that bothers me most about Spore is that, after leaving space, and after the first mission, they send you to colonize a planet that is in another star system.
My opinion is that, in Thrive, we should start with colonizing the planets of our own solar system after we reach the space stage (or during the civ stage), and i’m talking about a realistic colonization (something you can see in games like “terragenesis”)…what do you think?

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With the recent news and discussions about space exploration that I’ve been exposed to lately, have lead me to think that there isn’t much point to colonizing our solar system. There are very few resources that we could gain by colonizing Mars for example.

Similarly in Thrive it might only make sense to make small colonies in your solar system for practice. Really going all out and colonizing planets might only make sense when they are compatible enough with your physiology to not need space suits and really complex buildings.

I agree Colonies should be tested and developed on our solar systems planets since all of them have a wide variety of harsh atmospheres

Then later on in the game when you have reached higher technology and you want to maximize resource generation plonk a newly made terraformer or sumthin like that and bam Maximum resource generation

But what if your star system has more than one habitable planet? Would they still need spacesuits for gravity, or something like that? Or would star system generation only allow one habitable planet, upon which you start your adventure? Plus, what if you find a planet with a crust made of, say, 80% aluminum, that’s a pretty good reason to colonise it. What I’m trying to say is that you may spawn in a lucky system with high-yield resources or other habitable planets, or you can have trash-tier space rocks and gasballs with nothing useful. After all, we’re not spawning in our solar system, so we can’t expect it to have the same conditions. For all I know, you could have a single planet orbiting your star, forcing you to develop FTL travel before colonization, which would suck, but you can’t choose where you’re born, can you?

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Back on the forum again. i have so much discussion to catch up on, but I’ll start here.

I think it’s still a good idea to be able to colonize your own solar system before going out to the rest of the galaxy. I think it’s a good idea that we humans do that too. We don’t exactly know every nook and cranny of our small stellar cradle, there could be something we haven’t discovered yet, like more resources, or best case scenario (in my opinion), life on another planet or moon. Plus i think being on another planet and living there and having the most freedom you can get (being away from all the stuff happening on earth) is very nice.

I think it’s essential to be able to do that in Thrive because your race isn’t going to be prepared to travel around the galaxy right away, it needs to practice in its own backyard. As you explore the worlds around you, your spaceships get better and better until they’re ready to go out of the solar system. It’s exactly what we are doing, and what we are doing is not only improving our space technology but putting down the foundations for space tourism, colonization, and some people have even discussed space warfare. But right now we only have the solar system to explore. Skipping over that in thrive is basically skipping an entire chapter of the development of your civilization, as space opens up a new chapter for human civilization, and human civilization is definitely changing because of that. We definitely aren’t ready for interstellar travel, our solar system is going to prepare us for that.

I suppose it could depend on how your game generates. If your solar system barely has any resources you might want to beeline towards interstellar travel. But if your solar system does have a vast amount of resources and maybe even has another planet with life on it, you should at least be able to explore it before doing anything else.

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What if there’s a crashed spacecraft from another specie in my backyard like in Spore? Could I then scavange their method of interstellar travel?

It’s definitely good to practice with close by targets before going off to far away worlds.
However, when people talk about colonization they often imagine that there would be thousands of colonists, which I’ve read, is not really useful. Like there are basically no resources that can be profitably sent back, so the only thing the colony can do is to try to become self sustaining before the funding runs out. Not very useful.

Having some left behind tech to explore would certainly be nice. But I don’t like the idea of giving any crucial tech that way. Because then the underwater civ fans will attack and say “but wait, what if the aliens give the aquatic species tech to smelt metals”

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A bit late, but what other constraints would you have early in the Space Stage? Depending on how lax they are, could you start off “small” with AI capable of operating and maintaining remote outposts?

I know that technically doesn’t count as colonization, but at least your Nation gets an offworld foothold that’s a step up from rovers.

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one reason i could see for a large scale colonization of a planet in you home system would be if your experiencing extreme overpopulation, pollution, or used up all the resources on your home planet before FTL (like what earth will likely experience). Of course you could just make a bunch of large space stations colonies (like in mobile suit gundam) but it might be more efficient and cheaper to make a colony on one of the other planets.

hhyyrylainen Having some left behind tech to explore would certainly be nice. But I don’t like the idea of giving any crucial tech that way. Because then the underwater civ fans will attack and say “but wait, what if the aliens give the aquatic species tech to smelt metals”

i like that idea…after all, the thing with “we found an alien ship and now we have FTL” sounds too spore-like to me.

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I think there are some steps to consider before colonizing.

  1. Verify if there is any form of life on the said planet/satellite.

    a) If there are lifeforms, study them.

    A. If they are dangerous, either leave or destroy them and make sure there is no survivor. Then, construct a safe base, prepare base defense and proceed to step 2.

    B. If they are neither dangerous or pacific, construct a safe base, prepare base defense and proceed to step 2.

    C. If they are pacific, construct a safe base and proceed to step 2.

    b) If there is no lifeform, then construct a safe enough base (maybe with a hangar) and proceed to step 2.
  2. Verify if there is any natural danger that can occur. If there is any possibility of a natural disaster, prepare for such events. If the said disaster is too dangerous to establish a colony and that there is no safe way of killing this kind of event to prevent it from happening again in the future, terminate the colonization program.
  3. Study what impacts does living on the said planet/satellite can have on the body of any living being. Then, find a way to prepare every imported/exported living being for the changes that they will experience if leaving or joining the planet/satellite.
  4. Terraform the planet or satellite.
  5. Establish the colonies.

EDIT :

I fixed the problem. Thanks and welcome.

You don’t need to make them, the system will automatically do it for you.

No, that’s fine. :slightly_smiling_face:

This confused the bees out of me. Why are you using variables for simple specifications? Divide them properly into paragraphs per instance instead of mixing them and assigning letters to them.

For instance, it could’ve been divided as followed:

1.Verify if life
a)If there is life, study them.
1.If said life is dangerous, destroy them or leave, then proceed to step 2.
2.If life is pacific or not dangerous, prepare a base and defend it, then proceed to step 2.

2.Check for natural danger
a)
…You get the point. Sorry if I sounded a little harsh and snapped at you like that.

OK, that’s weird, it’s not registering my spaces…